Reading – The Missing Cat

Everyone!!

My Online Language has created these short stories to help students to improve their listening and reading English skills.

Listen carefully to the words and practice. Reading 5 minutes everyday can help develop English skills faster. Each topic you will have audio and PDF lesson to download and study off-line.

E.S.L Teachers can use these materials to teach students in a classroom setting.


My Online Language

Reading – Intermediate Level

The Missing Cat

The owner of a missing cat is asking for help. “My baby has been missing for over a month
now, and I want him back so badly,” said Mrs. Brown, a 56-year-old woman. Mrs. Brown lives
by herself in a trailer park near Clovis. She said that Clyde, her 7-year-old cat, didn’t come
home for dinner more than a month ago. The next morning he didn’t appear for breakfast
either. After Clyde missed an extra-special lunch, she called the police.
When the policeman asked her to describe Clyde, she told him that Clyde had beautiful
green eyes, had all his teeth but was missing half of his left ear, and was seven years old and
completely white. She then told the officer that Clyde was about a foot high.
A bell went off. “Is Clyde your child or your pet?” the officer suspiciously asked. “Well, he’s
my cat, of course,” Mrs. Brown replied. “Lady, you’re supposed to report missing PERSONS,
not missing CATS,” said the irritated policeman. “Well, who can I report this to?” she asked.
“You can’t. You have to ask around your neighbourhood or put up flyers,” replied the officer.

Mrs. Brown figured that a billboard would work a lot better than an 8″x11″ piece of
paper on a telephone pole. There was an empty billboard at the end of her street just
off the interstate highway. The billboard had a phone number on it. She called that
number, and they told her they could blow up a picture of Clyde (from Mrs. Brown’s
family album) and put it on the billboard for all to see.
“But how can people see it when they whiz by on the interstate?” she asked. “Oh, don’t
worry, ma’am, they only whiz by between 2 a.m. and 5:30 a.m. The rest of the day, the
interstate is so full of commuters that no one moves.” They told her it would cost only
$3,000 a month. So she took most of the money out of her savings account and
rented the billboard for a month.
The month has passed, but Clyde has not appeared. Because she has almost no money
in savings, Mrs. Brown called the local newspaper to see if anyone could help her rent
the billboard for just one more month. She is waiting but, so far, no one has stepped
forward.



Vocabulary Word:

WordMeaning
Albuma book with pages for keeping photographs or other paper objects that you have collected and may want to look at in the future
Billboarda very large board on which advertisements are shown, esp. at the side of a road
Commutera person who regularly travels between home and work
Describeto say or write what someone or something is like
Figurethe symbol for a number or an amount expressed in numbers
Flyera small piece of paper advertising a product or event, which is given to a lot of people
Neighbourhoodan area with characteristics that make it different from other areas, or the people who live in a particular area
Highwaya public road, especially an important road that joins cities or towns together
Interstateinvolving two or more of the states into which some countries such as the US are divided
Irritateto make someone angry or annoyed
Polea long, thin stick of wood or metal, often used standing straight up in the ground to support things
Suspiciouslyin a way that makes you think that something is wrong
Trailera wheeled vehicle for living or travelling in, especially for holidays, that contains beds and cooking equipment and can be pulled by a car
Whizto move or do something very fast
From Cambridge Dictionary

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